Pburkey

Author's details

Date registered: March 4, 2011

Latest posts

  1. What’s Up in the Sky — January 6, 2020
  2. What’s Up in the Sky — December 2, 2019
  3. What’s Up in the Sky — November 9, 2019
  4. What’s Up in the Sky — October 5, 2019
  5. What’s Up in the Sky — September 7, 2019

Author's posts listings

Jan 06

What’s Up in the Sky

What’s Up in the Sky – January, 2020 Important Work Being Done by Spacecraft Lately I have found myself writing about things most readers will never see, mostly due to the weather, but timing, observing site availability and other commitments all affect our observing experience. So my topic to kick off the new decade is …

Continue reading »

Dec 02

What’s Up in the Sky

What’s Up in the Sky – December, 2019 A Look Back at History and Up at the Planets Nineteen sixty eight was both a very bad and a very good year. The Smithsonian Magazine devoted an entire issue to 1968 as several historical events occurred that year, not all of them very uplifting, to say …

Continue reading »

Nov 09

What’s Up in the Sky

What’s Up in the Sky – November, 2019 A Variety of Sights Make Up November’s Nights With few bright stars to the south, fall and winter constellations still rising in the east, and summer constellations fading in the west, it’s a good thing the Moon and several planets will add to the sights worth viewing …

Continue reading »

Oct 05

What’s Up in the Sky

What’s Up in the Sky – October, 2019 There Is More In the Sky Than You Think Last month I wrote about several late summer/early autumn constellations, including Scorpius and Sagittarius in the south and Cygnus, Lyra, and Aquila overhead, whose member stars form the Summer Triangle. Although the former are no longer visible, the …

Continue reading »

Sep 07

What’s Up in the Sky

What’s Up in the Sky – September, 2019 September is Again a Good Time to Observe I have often said September is a good month for observing, and this year is no exception with the addition of two bright planets to the myriad of sights for both the eye and the telescope. Let’s begin with …

Continue reading »

Older posts «